Tim Bradley says another win over Manny Pacquiao will cement his legacy as a fighter
"I wanna be remembered, I wanna be talked about. Anytime they bring up Manny Pacquiao’s name in the future I wanna be mentioned along those lines,” says Tim Bradley. Jayson Otamias

LAS VEGAS – Not for anything else, but it’s his legacy which Tim Bradley is fighting for when he meets Manny Pacquiao anew inside the ring this Saturday (Sunday, Manila time) at the MGM Grand here.

Neither was he thinking about his World Boxing Organization (WBO) welterweight title or the prize purse involved that convinced him to accept facing Pacquiao for the third time over the last four years.

The 32-year-old native of Palm Springs, California said being mentioned in the same breath as the Filipino ring icon is more than enough to cement his status as one of best welterweight fighters of his era.

“Getting this match for a third time is everything for my career right now,” said Bradley, just one of six fighters to beat Pacquiao in his stellar boxing career (57-6-3, 38 KOs).

“Getting a win over a legend and an icon in Manny Pacquiao, a fighter that has been reigning for over a decade and an eight-time world division champion, right there you can be remembered forever by being a fighter like that.”

Bradley did beat the Filipino southpaw in their first meeting in 2012, although the outcome of their WBO title fight ended in a disputed split decision win.

The American, a +200 underdog opposite his longtime nemesis in the latest Vegas odds, then lost a unanimous decision to Pacquiao in their rematch two years later.

Now, he wants to get even by beating the Pacman without a cloud of doubt.

“I said I wanna be remembered. I don’t want to do this just to being another champion or another great champion, I wanna be remembered, I wanna be talked about. Anytime they bring up Manny Pacquiao’s name in the future I wanna be mentioned along those lines,” said Bradley, who also arrived here on Monday in time for his and Pacquiao’s scheduled grand arrival at the lobby of MGM Grand on Tuesday afternoon.

“To beat Manny Pacquiao so my name would always be relevant to the sport, and that’s what this fight is for me. It’s about being relevant for years.  When I die out and I’m done with boxing, my kids will be talking about it for decades,” he added.

Follow the writer on Twitter: @gerardmos