Manny Pacquiao: 'I was more worried about De La Hoya, Cotto than Mayweather'
Manny Pacquiao took at shot at Floyd Mayweather's lack of punching power. AP

HIS upcoming megabuck fight against Floyd Mayweather Jr. may be the biggest and richest of his career.

Yet Manny Pacquiao admitted being more concerned during the time he faced Oscar De La Hoya in 2008 and Miguel Cotto a year later than for his May 2 unification bout with the unbeaten and brash talking Mayweather.

“I’m more worried about De La Hoya and Cotto than my fight with Floyd,” said the Filipino boxing great in a series of tweets in his account @MannyPacquiao hours before personally joining Floyd Jr. at the Nokia Theater in Los Angeles for the only press event to mark their long-awaited welterweight showdown two months from now.

Pacquiao forced the great De La Hoya to retire at the start of the ninth round of their welterweight fight seven years ago, before pulling off a 12th round technical knockout against Cotto in their 2009 title match.

Just before the press conference, the only eight-time world division champion did an interview with ESPN_FirstTake.

In obvious allusion, too, to Mayweather’s lack of punching power, the Pacman said Cotto and 5-foot-10 Mexican Antonio Margarito were the two boxers he encountered who really punched hard.

Although carrying an unbeaten record of 47-0, Mayweather only has 26 knockout wins under his name.

“My footwork and hand combinations will be my advantage. I tell you Cotto and Margarito punch hard. This is boxing and it’s about punches,” said the 36-year-old boxing champion and congressman of Sarangani province.

Again, Pacquiao also reiterated he’s capable of inflicting Floyd his first career loss as a pro, and minced no words about his disdain for Mayweather, saying beating Floyd Jr. will be good for boxing in general.

“I'm here to prove that I can easily beat the undefeated,” he said without mentioning what is already an obvious thing. “Beating Floyd is good for boxing. When athletes have great success, their success goes to their head. That is bad for boxing.”

Pacquiao later on gave praise to God when he took to the podium of the Nokia Theater.  

“I want to let people know there is God who can raise something from nothing. I owe everything to God,” said the 36-year-old Filipino.

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