Where does Manny Pacquiao go after 'Fiasco of the Century?' See COLUMN
Manny Pacquiao does not deserve the controversies hounding him. It is really disheartening to see that the sport Pacquiao kept afloat for years is the same sport that is screwing him now. Jerome Ascano

SURGERY for a torn rotator cuff, the possible suspension of his boxing license, and criminal and civil charges for his failure to fully disclose his true physical condition for the so-called ‘Fight of the Century.’ Defrocked World Boxing Organization (WBO) welterweight champion Manny Pacquiao definitely did not envision these scenarios in the aftermath of his showdown with American Floyd Mayweather Jr. But as the unsavory events begin to unfold one after the other, the Filipino pugilist now finds himself parrying punches from various sectors.

In a huge letdown, the Pacquiao-Mayweather Jr. bout turned out to be pedestrian. Bothered by a bum right shoulder as early as the fourth round, Pacquiao struggled to put his combinations together. As if fighting with one arm was not enough, Pacquiao had to deal with a very slippery Mayweather Jr. Pacquiao kept the fight close until Mayweather Jr. sealed the outcome by finishing strong. Still, not a few thought the scorecards of the three judges did not reflect the closeness of the match.

When the rosin settled, Pacquiao disclosed to the media that he entered the fight with an injured right shoulder. He claimed that he tried to get last-minute treatment but the Nevada State Athletic Commission turned down his request. This is where all hell broke loose. As it turned out, Pacquiao accomplished during the weigh-in a medical checklist wherein he claimed that he was not suffering from any injury. By subsequently claiming that he had been injured weeks before the fight, Pacquiao in effect disowned the statement he made in the medical checklist. The way officials of the NSAC see it, Pacquiao committed perjury which is classified as a felony and punishable with jail time. In addition to the possible criminal charge, Pacquiao may end up receiving sanctions from the Nevada commission in his capacity as a professional boxer. There is talk of the commission suspending Pacquiao’s license and even withholding his paycheck pending the result of its investigation.

As if things cannot get any worse, a class suit against Pacquiao and Top Rank Promotions was recently filed by disgruntled boxing fans who feel they were duped into buying tickets for the fight. Pacquiao-Mayweather Jr. is no different from a product that was sold to the public by promoters at a lavish price but turned out to be a lemon.

As things stand, Pacquiao is headed to the operating table to address his shoulder injury. Counting rehabilitation work, Pacquiao is expected to be out of commission for almost a year. Mayweather Jr. has expressed interest in a rematch, but it will be better for Pacquiao to first resolve all the issues relating to the first match before talking about a return match. Moreover, if he decides to lace on the gloves again, Pacquiao should take a tune-up match to convince the public that he is back in tip-top shape.


Yet another way out for Pacquiao is just archive the gloves and call it a day. He does not deserve the controversies hounding him. It is really disheartening to see that the sport Pacquiao kept afloat for years is the same sport that is screwing him now. Pacquiao will be 37 by the time the rematch takes place and he will have been inactive for almost a year. The rematch with Mayweather Jr. will prove nothing because fight fans are now convinced that the fight between the two should have taken place in 2010. It is also safe to say that Mayweather Jr. will resort to the same hit-and-run tactic when he meets Pacquiao again.

With eight world boxing titles and a host of victories over accomplished champions, Pacquiao really has nothing more to prove. From a financial standpoint, he has earned enough money to last two lifetimes. In boxing, as well as in life, the toughest fights can be won by just walking away.

Follow the writer on Twitter: @edtolentino