As he joins 'People's Team,' Ginebra coach Tim Cone willing to drop corporate look from time to time
Coach Tim Cone exchanges fist bumps with Ginebra top honcho Bernie Marquez. Jerome Ascano

IF the run-and-gun is bound to give way to the triangle offense at Barangay Ginebra, the team's new coach, Tim Cone, is also willing to accept change.

A fashion change, that is.

Known to wear the corporate look since he started his coaching career with the Alaska Aces in 1988, Cone brought along the same stiff dress code when he moved to the Star Hotshots four years ago.

But now that he's joining the 'People's Team,' the league's most successful coach certainly knows how to fit in, saying he's ready to drop the tie and long sleeves from time to time when he starts coaching Ginebra.

"I see they're wearing company shirts most of the time. For marketing purposes, I'll wear most of that when it needs to be done," said Cone, referring to the company shirts the Ginebra coaching staff usually wears.

"It's Ginebra, you can do whatever it takes."

[See Cone makes vow as he formally assumes Ginebra job: 'We'll build a team that fans can be proud of']

Still, the 57-year old American mentor said he prefers to 'generally wear a tie (and long sleeves)' as he begins his quest to turn around the fortunes of a team that has not won a league championship in eight seasons.

"I love the neck tie. It's a sign of respect for me. I respect the game, I respect the fans and i respect the job by wearing this necktie," he said.

Ginebra coaches had previously tried the corporate look during the brief run of former Cone assistant Jeffrey Cariaso, but reverted back to company shirts a few games before his departure.

[See New dress code gives Ginebra staff a 'professional look' under Cariaso]

Cone, however, insisted the dress code will be the least of his concerns after his transfer to Ginebra, as he's bent on having the players buy into his system.

"The necktie (matter) occupies the lowest part of our priorities right now," he said. "What we are up to now is how to instill our system to the players."

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