Dioncee Holts' mini-me serves as his lucky charm and critic rolled into one
Young Brandon always inspires Dioncee Holts to give his best playing for Arellano. Dante Peralta

ARELLANO stalwart Dioncee Holts brings along with him one lucky charm every time the Chiefs have a scheduled game in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament.

And he goes by the name of Brandon Philip Holts.

The American sophomore said he is always inspired to play each time his three-year-old personally watches him live at the patron section of The Arena in San Juan.

“I’m always motivated when he’s there, (but) sometimes during games like this, it is pressure ‘cause you don’t want to let him down,” said Dioncee shortly after Arellano’s 68-77 loss to league leader Letran on Friday.

“But I just try to keep him motivated, throw him a lot of positive stuff, try to put on a show for him ‘cause he gets bored,” he added.

In as much as young Brandon is his inspiration, his mini-me also happens to be his biggest critic.

At a young age, Dioncee said his son already understands how the sport is being played.

It’s easy for little Braedon to be knowledgeable about the game as his parents both play the sport.

And believe it or not, he trains and play the game in a real basketball court at home.

“He has his own real basketball court at home,” shared Dioncee. “So he trains everyday with his grandpa. He does drills, pushups, suicides, he can dribble with two balls, and one time he does three balls, he can do jump shots, he does behind the backs.”

“Oh my God he’s a handful, he has a lot of energy. I don’t know where he gets his energy,” he added.

Dioncee, whose team dropped to a 4-2 card for a three-way logjam at third place with Jose Rizal University and Perpetual Help, also disclosed how he cherishes the moment when the team and its supporters start singing the school hymn at the end of every game.

It delights him seeing his son singing along with the rest of the Arellano community.

“Best part for him when he’ll do that (sing the school hymn),” he said while raising his closed fist as if singing the school hymn.

The Arellano big man, however, was quick to back down when asked who the better player is.

When he was his son’s age, Dioncee admitted it’s no brainer Brandon is a lot better than him.

“Him of course,” he said. “I was not worried about basketball when I was three years old, he’s more focused.”


But the proud father added his son is not all about basketball.

“He also loves Pacquiao. He prays a lot, he loves to sing bible songs, he’s a very positive kid, he’s full of joy,” he said.

“Everything I do, from the time he was born to now, is for him, for his future,” Dioncee added. “Everything for him to have a bright future I would do.”

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